Latest news | MortgageRates.co.nz

Results: Bank Policy

Zoomed out shot of a city, lightning strike
17 June 2022

A global interest rate shock is underway

As a result of annual inflation rates surprising on the high side overseas, recent renewed increases in energy prices, and rising ...

Person holding out empty pockets
03 June 2022

A new 'least regrets' policy from the Reserve Bank of NZ

On May 25, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand told us that they have decided to implement a new “least regrets” policy which is compl...

Hands, ruler, person measuring and drawing with pencil
23 May 2022

Shorter fixed term mortgage rates preferred

I sometimes struggle to remain polite when journalists ask me if the rising rates environment means now is a good time to fix for ...

25 February 2021

OCR remains unchanged, RBNZ to keep monetary policy steady

There's no reason for strongly believing that we face a future of sustained high inflation which will require an interest rate crunch. But borrowers should pay attention to the upside risks and the extreme uncertainty regarding how far and fast rates rise.

Straight road lined with trees
11 November 2020

Why interest rates will remain low for a few years - Tony Alexander

Banks lend out about $280 billion to households for housing purchases. But they have funding from households exactly equal to $200 billion. It might pay to stop and think about that number for a moment.

Back view of young couple walking on grass
20 July 2020

Rate cuts are likely to be short term only

Margins are below average for terms of three years and longer. This tell us that unless there's a change in borrowing costs, anyone holding out for further falls in rates is taking quite a gamble.

Hand holding small globe, in front of mountain landscape
01 May 2020

Breaking: Loan-to-value (LVR) rules are removed by the RBNZ

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) announced yesterday that the loan-to-value ratio (LVR) restrictions that they put in place back in 2013 will be removed from 1 May for 12 months. So what does this mean?

Banker in corporate attire, pointing finger